Earn extra money from ‘secondary turmoil’ during the pandemic


Making extra money from pandemic: More than half of Britons with ‘sideways unrest’ started them in last 18 months

  • About 10% of respondents consider a side job if they are on leave
  • Those with secondary hardship have added an average of £ 6,300 in extra income this year
  • AirTasker estimates secondary unrest is worth around £ 346 billion to the UK economy










More than half of Britons with ‘sideways restlessness’ started during the coronavirus pandemic, new research shows.

A survey of 2,000 UK workers by the online freelance market Fiverr found that 58% of those who moonlight in some form or another started doing so after March 2020.

According to the company, more Britons have been encouraged to earn extra money through irregular employment due to the pandemic, the higher cost of living and the need to ‘give a perfect Christmas’.

New job: A survey of 2,000 UK workers by the online freelance market Fiverr said 58% of those who moonlight in some form or another started doing so from March 2020

Additionally, he found that 23 percent of workers said fears of losing their jobs made them consider starting a sideline, while around 10 percent said they would consider the possibility if they were. put on leave.

Younger people are also more likely to have joined in the scramble, with 31% of 16-24 year olds having an extra job, compared to around one-fifth of the general population.

Those with secondary hardship have added an average of £ 6,300 more to their income this year.

Examples include online sales, public relations and marketing, writing, gaming, website development, and television, film and music production.

Although Covid-19 has encouraged more people to earn some extra cash on the side, side turmoil has become more common in recent years as wage stagnation has led many to find increasingly unconventional ways to pay the bills.

They can also be very lucrative for the economy at large. A study by local services market company AirTasker estimated that ancillary activities are worth around £ 346 billion to the UK economy.

Publishing the research, AirTasker co-founder Tim Fung said: “The global pandemic has caused many of us to rethink our way of life and what is important to us, so it’s great to see so much of Britons learn new skills – whether to pursue a passion or hobby, to diversify their skills or to further develop their careers. ‘

Podcast: The best of 2021 and Steven Bartlett’s tips for starting a business

It’s safe to say that 2021 has been a hectic year for the economy and personal finance – and our podcast has it all covered.

Georgie Frost looks back on some of the best tracks in the series with Simon Lambert, Lee Boyce, Tanya Jefferies and Helen Crane.

Additionally, as a special New Years bonus, this week’s podcast features an interview with entrepreneur, Diary of a CEO podcaster, and new Dragon in the den, Steven Bartlett.

Tap play above or listen on Apple Podcasts, Acast, Spotify and Audioboom or visit our This is Money Podcast page

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